Occupying for health – success stories

In my last post, I wrote about the importance of occupying an array of fields that impact our country’s health. Lest this task seem too daunting to be accomplished, I thought I’d take a moment to highlight some success stories on this front.

Access to healthy foods is an important determinant of health and an important factor in health inequities. The Food Trust, a non-profit based out of Pennsylvania, is tackling this problem, aiming to make healthy food available to all. Among their many innovative projects is the Pennsylvania Fresh Food Financing Initiative, a grant and loan program to encourage supermarket development in underserved neighborhoods throughout the state, an idea that is now being replicated nationally. Some other creative developments in the field of nutrition and healthy food access: taking a page out of the junk and fast food industry’s book, with their billions spent on marketing, and branding baby carrots in a way that’s fun and exciting; and tapping into behavioral economics to redesign cafeteria lunch lines in a way that increases purchase of healthy foods and decreases purchase of unhealthy foods (an inexpensive and effective approach!).

Given that homicide and suicide are among the leading causes of death among those age 1 to 34, violence prevention is another key aspect of attaining the health our society deserves. Chicago-based CeaseFire combines research and street outreach to track violence, interrupt and intervene (with well-trained professionals from the communities they represent with a background on the streets), and engage in longer term risk reduction and behavior and norm change. Even more exciting – it’s working.

Neither access to healthy foods nor neighborhood safety – not to mention walkability, pollution-free environments, and a host of other things – is possible without intelligent and innovative urban planning. Thankfully, we have the likes of The Congress for the New Urbanism working to promote walkable, mixed-used neighborhood development, sustainable communities and healthier living conditions.

And while our national political discussion is so bogged down by discussions of whether to help low-income individuals and families that we haven’t had a conversation about how best to help them, organizations like the Family Independence Initiative, which was featured in the New York Times this past summer, are taking an approach radically different from our typical social service model, tapping into the strengths and support systems of low-income families, allowing them to determine their own paths and advance together. This too, has been shown to work.

Across all of these health-related issues, the media plays a role in shaping behaviors and norms, and Hollywood, Health, and Society is bridging two drastically separate sectors with its work to provide entertainment industry professionals with accurate, timely, and engaging information and case examples for health storylines, as well as study the content and impact of these storylines.

Of course, just because it’s not all about healthcare doesn’t mean healthcare isn’t at the table – healthcare providers can play just as important role in prevention and promotion as they do in treatment, and places like the Codman Square Health Center make that crystal clear. A community health center in one of the most impoverished areas of Boston, the Center provides a range of public health and community services (ranging from computer classes and financial help to fitness opportunities and hands-on cooking classes, not to mention youth services, civic engagement initiatives, and a close linkage with the Codman Square Academy charter school).

So, as daunting as the task of occupying for health seems, there are many people in many places doing amazing things. To quote the founder of the Codman Square Health Center: “We need to create integrated systems that promote community and health values. Like all change such cultural shift will take a generation or more to accomplish. But I am reminded of the story President John F. Kennedy told of the French leader who asked his gardener to plant a rare tree on his estate. ‘But the tree won’t bloom for 100 years’ the gardener said. The response: ‘In that case, plant it this afternoon.’”

So here’s to starting planting – and occupying. Cheers.

Vinu Ilakkuvan received her Masters of Science degree in Society, Human Development, and Health from the Harvard School of Public Health in May 2011. She currently works in youth violence prevention in Richmond, Virginia, and blogs about public health at www.pursuitofpublichealth.com

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Posted in Community, Health behavior, healthcare, Innovation, public health